Interpreting Donald Trump’s “Oxy Electorate”: On the Interaction of Pain and Politics

On January 20 – inauguration day – the HBO news talk show Real Time with Bill Maher aired its fifteenth season premier. Unsurprisingly, Donald Trump was the topic of the hour. After Maher and his panel of pundits concluded their discussion, the host delivered an editorial monologue analyzing Trump’s electoral victory and offered a provocativeContinue reading “Interpreting Donald Trump’s “Oxy Electorate”: On the Interaction of Pain and Politics”

Deadly Intoxication, or: A Series of Odd Coincidences

“This pussy has teeth; no one should fuck me ever” — Margaret   I begin this post with exciting news: Slava Tsukerman and Anne Carlisle are collaborating on either a sequel to or a documentary about the making of Liquid Sky, the 1982 science fiction movie about Margaret, the new wave Edie Sedgewick-inspired club-hopping modelContinue reading “Deadly Intoxication, or: A Series of Odd Coincidences”

The Long, Proud Tradition of the Fourth of July Buzzkill

Celebratory drinking has fueled Fourth of July festivity from its inception in the years following 1776, when double rum-rations for the troops, endless toasts at formal dinners, and makeshift booze-stalls at public gatherings became norms. And it was not long before high-minded patriots began to worry over the excesses of republican revelry. Before the FourthContinue reading “The Long, Proud Tradition of the Fourth of July Buzzkill”

Taverns, locals and street corners: Cross-chronological studies in community drinking, regulation and public space

Editor’s Note: Today brings the first in a series of postings on The Taverns Project, a  pilot study of Connected Communities sponsored by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (UK). Participant David Rosenthal, of the Architecture and Civil Engineering Department, University of Bath, describes the overall aims of the cross-disciplinary, multi-national, and transhistorical project; laterContinue reading “Taverns, locals and street corners: Cross-chronological studies in community drinking, regulation and public space”

In Search of the Drunken Native

In a March 3, 2012 New York Times article, “At Tribe’s Door, a Hub of Beer and Heartache,” reporter Timothy Williams provides yet another account of the terrible consequences associated with alcohol consumption among native Americans.  This article, which of course joins many others on the same topic, touches on a number of familiar points,Continue reading “In Search of the Drunken Native”

The Stoned Ages, The Day (or Sixteen) After

Editor’s Note: The post below by Joe Spillane was written after the original September air date of “The Stoned Ages.”  If you’re just tuning in now, don’t worry– it’s probably still pretty relevant.  Readers who caught my last-minute notice regarding “The Stoned Ages” documentary on the History Channel know that I was a little ambivalentContinue reading “The Stoned Ages, The Day (or Sixteen) After”

There’s Something Wrong with Aunt Diane: What Morality, Medicine & Documentary Can’t Explain

Acclaimed documentarian Liz Garbus‘s most recent documentary feature, There’s Something Wrong with Aunt Diane (which premiered this week on HBO), examines what might have led supermom Diane Schuler to drive a borrowed minivan southbound in the northbound lane of the New York’s Taconic State Parkway two years ago. With her two young children and herContinue reading “There’s Something Wrong with Aunt Diane: What Morality, Medicine & Documentary Can’t Explain”

More Dispatches from Buffalo: Gender and Intoxication

Editors’ Note: Today’s report on the ADHS conference comes from guest blogger Nancy Campbell. Some of you may recall Nancy’s remembrance of the late Bob Schuster, which appeared on this site back in February.  We’re grateful to her for this contribution as well. The “Gender and Intoxication” panel illustrated a familiar theme to which historiansContinue reading “More Dispatches from Buffalo: Gender and Intoxication”

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