“Nightmarish” “Horrifying”: Thomas Randall’s The Twelfth Step

Editor’s Note: Today’s post comes from Matthew J. Raphael, a retired professor of English. Raphael is author of Bill W. and Mr. Wilson (University of Massachusetts Press, 2000), as well as other books and essays on the place of alcohol in American literature and culture. His previous work for Points includes reviewing the movie Bill W. and a review ofContinue reading ““Nightmarish” “Horrifying”: Thomas Randall’s The Twelfth Step”

In Memory of Glenn C.

Editor’s Note: The message below comes from the Symposium on AA History, which will be hosting its next meeting in January 2021. Click the link for more info about the group. On July 27, 2020 one of our fellowship’s finest historians, Glenn C. passed away in his sleep. Glenn was integral in the formation andContinue reading “In Memory of Glenn C.”

Unidad, Servicio y Recuperación: Twelve-Step Recovery in Civil War Guatemala, Part II

Editor’s Note: Today we finish our two-part series from Dr. Heather Vrana on the history of Alcoholics Anonymous in Latin America. Check out the first part here. You can find out more about Dr. Vrana and her work here.  Treatments tell us about more than scientific understandings of ailments. They also reveal cultural and socialContinue reading “Unidad, Servicio y Recuperación: Twelve-Step Recovery in Civil War Guatemala, Part II”

Unidad, Servicio y Recuperación: Twelve-Step Recovery in Civil War Guatemala, Part I

Editor’s Note: Today’s post comes from Dr. Heather Vrana. Vrana (Ph.D. Indiana University, 2013) is Associate Professor of Modern Latin America in the Department of History at the University of Florida. Vrana’s research interests include disability, social movements, human rights, photography, and youth and student movements in Central America. She is author of the monograph ThisContinue reading “Unidad, Servicio y Recuperación: Twelve-Step Recovery in Civil War Guatemala, Part I”

Challenging the Foundation Myths

Editor’s Note: Today’s post comes from Matthew J. Raphael, a retired professor of English. Raphael is author of Bill W. and Mr. Wilson (University of Massachusetts Press, 2000), as well as other books and essays on the place of alcohol in American literature and culture. “Over the years,” observes William H. Schaberg in Writing theContinue reading “Challenging the Foundation Myths”

Points Bookshelf: “US of AA” by Joe Miller

Editor’s Note: Today’s post comes from Dr. Jeremy Milloy, the W. P. Bell Postdoctoral Fellow at Mount Allison University. In it, he adds to our Points Bookshelf series, where we examine and review recent books about alcohol and drug history. More than a traditional review, however, Milloy also interviews Miller. Enjoy!  Alcoholics Anonymous is oneContinue reading “Points Bookshelf: “US of AA” by Joe Miller”

Stretching the Boundaries of “History”

Editor’s note: Today sees the final installment of the Points tribute to AA historian Glenn C.  Commentator Jackie B. graduated in 2002 with a degree in Theater and Performance Studies from U.C. Berkeley.  Sober since 2006, she is the founder and Artistic Director of Recovery Works Theater (RWT) in San Francisco. Her work has beenContinue reading “Stretching the Boundaries of “History””

Rich Dubiel Meets Glenn C.

Editor’s Note: Today we present the second installation in our roundtable series celebrating the work of AA Historian Glenn C. Richard Dubiel, formerly Professor of Communications at University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, was an early beneficiary of Glenn’s work with Hindsfoot Press, which published his insightful “Sober Sleuths: Lawrence Block and James Lee Burke” in 1999.Continue reading “Rich Dubiel Meets Glenn C.”

The Social World of Alcoholics Anonymous: How It Works

Editor’s Note: This post is brought to you by Annette R. Smith, and is taken from her 2007 book The Social World of Alcoholics Anonymous: How It Works. Smith received her masters in social work from the University of California, Berkeley in 1961, and her Ph.D. from UC San Diego in 1991. She worked for severalContinue reading “The Social World of Alcoholics Anonymous: How It Works”

Alcoholism in Communist Yugoslavia

(Editor’s Note: This post is brought to you by contributing editor Mat Savelli, a postdoctoral fellow at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada.) Yugoslavia had a problem with alcoholism. Or at the very least, that’s what the country’s psychiatrists generally thought. During the Communist era (from the end of the WWII through to the country’s collapse inContinue reading “Alcoholism in Communist Yugoslavia”

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